CES 2015: Cocktail Audio X12 Ripper/Server/Streamer Integrated Amp

Sometimes it's hard to tell whether something is "personal audio" or "computer audio" or floating around in some as yet to be defined new-millennia audio gadget niche. Audio Plus Services touted the Cocktail Audio X12 ($799) as a Swiss Army Knife for audio...okay, I'll buy that, it does do a heck of a lot of stuff.

With up to 4TB of internal storage the X12 will rip CDs and store them in numerous formats including: FLAC, WAV, APE/CUE, ALAC, PCM, MP3, WMA, M4A, AAC, AIFF, AIF, Ogg Vorbis and Playlist (PLS, M3U) files, and will add metadata and cover art to you files when connected to the web. It can also store and play high-resolution FLAC and WAV files to 24/192. It presents itself as a UPnP (DLNA) music server on your home network, and is capable of streaming audio to Sonos and like devices, or to Apple products with AirPlay using its "Shareplay" function. The X12 comes with a remote control, but can also be controlled through a web interface from laptops and PCs, or with iOS and Android handheld devices. It can also record at 16/44.1 records and tapes through its analog input.

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The rear of the X12 is jam packed with connections.

Lastly, the X12 includes a 60WPC class-D power amplifier to drive speakers directly. As I took in the wide variety of features and functions in this compact unit I couldn't help but think this thing would be great for folks with small apartments and students living the dorm life.

Cocktail Audio also makes a couple of higher-end versions of the product called the X30 ($1695) and X40 ($2600), which are DSD capable. You can check them all out on the Cocktail Audio website.

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COMMENTS
forkboy1965's picture

I don't know.... I think I would much prefer the ability to add metadata and cover art via another route. My personal experience with my recent foray into classical music suggests (at least with classical) that metadata on the Internet is rather hit or miss. And more miss than I would like.

If I could upload such data from my computer (not unlike changing data in iTunes through the Information tab) I'd find this route more comfortable. Otherwise it is very interesting.

Tyll Hertsens's picture
I think I remember reading on the product's page that meta data can be entered a number of ways.