Audio Science Guide

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Tyll Hertsens  |  May 13, 2016  |  8 comments
In this article, we're primarily going to discuss the dynamic nature of the headphone driver as an electrical load on the amplifier driving it, which is expressed as impedance and is essentially additive to the resistance of the voice coil. Impedance is somewhat like resistance in that it can be expressed in Ohms, but it's quite different in that it is "reactive" and the impedance in Ohms can change depending on the frequency applied.
Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 06, 2015  |  35 comments

It's taken me a long time to feel like I had enough knowledge about this subject to attempt a serious overview. Lots more to learn, of course, but here's my current understanding of headphone frequency response measurements.

Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 21, 2015  |  28 comments

A bunch of concepts about how a target response is developed and what it might look like were introduced in Part One of this article. Here, in Part Two, we look at a variety of plots and make observations based on what we learned in Part One.

Tyll Hertsens  |  Aug 20, 2012  |  50 comments

Square waves are a cool signal. They contain lots of frequency response info, but, unlike the frequency response plot, also contain some visible information on the phase and time response of the headphones. I highly recommend them...

...but not for listening. Yeeeesh!

Tyll Hertsens  |  Mar 17, 2015  |  33 comments

In part one we will look at how the THD+noise plot is acquired and what it means. In part two we will look at a variety of measured data with an eye towards interpretation.

Tyll Hertsens  |  May 11, 2011  |  13 comments

They've been around since the 70's and never really caught on, but all of a sudden a couple small headphone makers have entered the fray with new planar magnetic headphones and ... Oh. My. Gosh. ... they're very good.

Before reviewing some of these headphones, I thought it would be a good idea to write an article describing how this "what once was old is new again" technology works. So come along for a ride as I describe how planar magnetic headphones work ... and how I busted mine all to pieces.

 |  Jun 10, 2016  |  22 comments
I'm up against a bit of a wall here as I'm going on vacation next week—John Grandberg will have a headphone amp review going up, so stay tuned—so I haven't been able to do all the number crunching I'd like. None the less, I'm far enough in to provide some cool graphs of the results so far.
Tyll Hertsens, xnor, Roger Strummer  |  Apr 26, 2011  |  1 comments
This page is being reserved for work on a web-based headphone measurement graphing tool. With it you will be able to compare various headphone characteristics from among the headphones we have in our database.

I want to especially thank members Roger Stummer and xnor for their willingness to help with this very important task for the headphone enthusiast community and for consumers at large.

THANKS GUYS!!! :)

Okay gentlemen, the space is yours.

Tyll Hertsens  |  May 05, 2011  |  15 comments

By now, most folks are aware of the potential for hearing loss by playing music too loud on headphones. I won’t bother you with it yet again. I’m going to try to take another approach. If you are turning the volume up to loud levels, you’re just throwing all that money you spent on great sound out the window. Here’s why.
Jan Meier, Tyll Hertsens  |  Nov 18, 2014  |  52 comments
Dr. Jan Meier, of Meier Audio, recently submitted this article for me to consider publishing. He and I have had many a discussion, and quite a few disagreements, about the nature and effects of amplifier output impedance over the years. While I still have some concerns with his view brought to light here (I'll intersperse some of my comments in italics through the course of the article), I have moved away from the simple view that lower output impedance is always better. The following article does a lot to show a bit more sophisticated view of factors involved, and I thought it would be useful for InnerFidelity readers.
NwAvGuy  |  Oct 03, 2011  |  14 comments

Top Gear is one of the BBC’s biggest shows. They evaluate expensive cars in entertaining ways then turn them over to their anonymous racing driver, known only as The Stig, to find out how fast they’ll lap their track. Some say NwAvGuy is Stig’s geeky cousin. Instead of testing cars, as an Electrical Engineer, I design and test audio gear. I want to thank Tyll for requesting my thoughts on measuring electronics. I'm all for improving measurements

WHY MEASUREMENTS? Here are some key reasons:

Tyll Hertsens  |  Jan 07, 2012  |  35 comments

I really wanted to objectively show break-in effects were measurable and audible.

"Desire," says the Buddha, "is the source of our suffering."

Guess I'm not going to get what I want, I'll just have to stop wanting it.

Wanna see what I did get?

Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 09, 2016  |  21 comments

I was measuring some DIY headphones this weekend and got sucked into playing with filter paper in front of the driver. Thought all you DIYers out there would get a kick out of the data.

Tyll Hertsens  |  Mar 30, 2011  |  1 comments
For those of us who really want a clear and comprehensive overview of how the human hearing system works to identify the location of sounds, there is one book cited above all others that serves as the text on the subject: Jens Blauert's "Spatial Hearing: The Psychophysics of Human Sound Localization."
Tyll Hertsens  |  Sep 08, 2011  |  42 comments

Subjectivist: "Man, I got my headphones last week and they're breaking in nicely."
Obectivist: "Yer nuts, dude, it's your head breaking in to the sound of your new headphones."
Subjectivist: "Leave me alone, troll, take your objectivism to 'Sound Science.' We have the minds of Gods and poets, and don't need your weights and measures to know what we know what we know."
Objectivist: "What can I say to someone who's their own placebo?"
Subjectivist: "Break-in exists ... I've heard it ... I stamp my feet three times and you will go away."
Objectivist: "Lol ... you couldn't blind test your way out of a paper bag!"

And so it goes.

Let's try to clear a bit of this up, eh?

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